The Montford Point Marine Association (MPMA) is a military veteran's organization, founded to memorialize the legacy of the first African Americans to serve in the United States Marine Corps. The first African American Marines were trained at Camp Montford Point, in Jacksonville, North Carolina, from 1942 to 1949.
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**** NMPMA CONVENTION ****

Has Concluded

in

New Orleans, Louisiana

49th Convention Minutes Now Available

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50th National Convention is now in planing

Mobile Alabama

2015

“Preserving The Legacy”

“Paying It Forward by Educating, Commemorating, and Rededicating Our Efforts”

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Personal Security While Traveling

Notify a trusted person of your departure and return dates, but don't otherwise publicize your travel or vacation plans. Leave contact numbers with trusted friends or family. Check plane, train, and bus times before you travel. Sit near other people or near aisles or doors. Learn the location of emergency alarms and exits. Stay awake and alert when using public transportation. Consider purchasing special clothing or accessories to hide your passport, money, or credit cards. Keep the majority of your funds in travelers checks and hidden; carry some in your wallet or handbag. Use a money clip. If you are robbed, you may lose the money in the clip but will retain important credit cards and documents. Keep valuables out of sight and luggage close at hand. If carrying a handbag, keep it in front of you, closed, with the fastening toward your body. Keep a wallet in your front pants pocket. Let go if your bag is snatched. Do some research on the area you are visiting.  
 

Talk to the host convention coordinator regarding travel advisories or warnings. When traveling, dress casually; dress down where appropriate. Be aware of local customs. Don't wear excess jewelry. Reduce wallet and purse contents, particularly cards denoting affiliations, memberships, accounts, etc. At airports, proceed through security checks and go to the boarding area as quickly as possible. These areas are usually the most secure in the airport. In any crowded situation, be aware of any crowding or jostling, even if it appears innocent. This is often a ploy by pickpockets to distract you. Be very careful any time you use a telephone calling card. Fraudulent uses of these cards are on the rise. Look for people observing your card or your fingers as you dial your code. Avoid being heard giving the number to local telephone operators.

Personal Security in Hotels

Do not discuss your business or travel plans in public areas where they may be overheard. Discuss your travel plans and movements during your stay with as few people as possible. Selecting a hotel room on the third to fifth floor generally will keep you out of reach of criminal activity from the street but still within reach of most fire truck ladders. Do not entertain strangers in your hotel room. Be alert to overly friendly locals who may have criminal intentions. They may offer to take you to a "special" restaurant. Their ruse may be to offer drugged refreshments. Never leave valuables in your hotel room exposed or unattended, even in a locked suitcase. Place valuables--money, jewelry, airplane tickets, credit cards, passport--in a hotel safe deposit box or room safe. Familiarize yourself with escape routes in case of fire or other catastrophe. Use the door chain or bolt lock whenever you are in your room. Use the door viewer (peephole) before opening the door to visitors. Do not discuss your room number while standing in the lobby or leave your room key on restaurant or bar tables. Keep your room neat so you will notice disturbed or missing items quickly.

By using these basic safety tips and your own common sense, you can help protect yourself.

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INFORMATION PROVIDED BELOW IS OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND ADVICE PROVIDED BY INDEPENDENT SOURCES AND IS PROVIDED SOLEY AS AWARNESS ADVICE

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In recent years, hotels have become increasingly adept at finding ways to nickel and dime their customers. According to a study published last year by PriceWaterHouseCooper's Hospitality Division, hotels are gorging themselves on surcharges and hidden fees. Hotels worldwide were on track to rake in nearly $2 billion in surcharges and hidden fees in 2007, more than tripling the $550 million they took in just four years ago. That's a lot of minibar charges and towel replacement fees.


Groundskeeping:
Make sure to take time to smell the roses in that lushly landscaped garden because you are likely to billed $3 or more a night for the effort involved in keeping the greenery perky.


Towels:
Need a towel at the pool? Expect to pay a buck or two. Don't scamper off to your room with it either, as you may be billed five dollars or more if you forget to return it to the attendant after your swim.


Business center, fitness room:
If there's a room with special equipment in it you'll probably get charged for simply staying in the same hotel with said equipment, even if you never venture into the business center or gym. Fees typically run $5 - $10 a day. At resorts, this is typically called the "resort fee."


Safe:
Hotels are tacking $1-$3 dollar a night "Safe Warranty" fees onto bills to cover the cost of providing the safe and the insurance policy that covers the things stored in it. (Good luck collecting anything if that in-room safe is burgled though, as most hotels post signs disclaiming responsibility for valuables.)


Housekeeping, bellman gratuity fees:
These folks certainly deserve to be paid well for their hard work, and most travelers show their appreciation with tips. But before you dig out the dollars, be aware that fees of $10-$30 a stay are being added to some hotel bills to cover housekeeping and bellman gratuities.


Water and newspapers:
How nice that a bottle of pure spring water was thoughtfully left in your room. Don't drink it. Chances are it's not a gift and you will be billed anywhere from $4-$6 a bottle. The newspaper that shows up at your door in the morning? Expect to be billed for the "convenience."


Energy surcharge:
Intended to recover the rising costs of providing electrical power, this charge can add $3-$6 dollars a day to your bill.


Early check in or out/extended cancellation:
Checked in earlier than the hotel's stated check-in time? You may be billed up to $50 for that early access. Had to leave sooner than planned? Expect to be charged anywhere from $50 to the cost of one night's stay. And make sure to check the cancellation policy: Hotels that used to allow you to cancel the same day before 6 p.m.are now billing customers for one night's stay if they don't cancel 48 hours ahead of time.


Shuttle service:
Taking the hotel shuttle from the airport used to be free, but it's likely to cost you now, and almost as much as taking a cab to your lodgings.


Baggage-holding:
Travelers with late-day flights often ask hotels to store their bags so they can enjoy another vacation day before heading to the airport. Some hotels are now charging up to $3 for each bag they babysit for the day.


Bartenders:
Check the bill before you tell the bartender to keep the change. Posters on several travel boards have reported seeing charges for 20% of each drink added to their tabs for the bartender gratuity.


Room block fees:
You'd like to reserve a bunch of rooms, all on one floor, for a family reunion or other event? No problem, because some hotels will be happy to bill you $10-$20 for that service.


Mini-Bar:
No, it's not the insane prices charged for those goodies, it's the charges that are now added to your bill if you move something in the bar to make room for your own bottle of water, or even pick something up to look at it for a few seconds (sensors in the bar record your action and add the product's fee to your room bill.) Some travelers who've routinely asked for the mini-bar to be cleared out before their arrival have been surprised by $50 "unstocking" fees.


Random incorrect charges: Numerous posters on travel forums have reported getting charged for smoking in non-smoking rooms when the evil weed had never touched their lips. Ding: cleaning fee of $100 to $250, and sometimes more. Other random fees include being charged for unordered movies, unmade phone calls, etc.


What to do

1. Be aware of your rights. According to federal law, additional fees should never be a surprise. Hotels must post information about such fees "clearly and conspicuously." What "clearly and conspicuously" means in practice is in the eye of the beholder, but if extra fees aren't clearly stated in the reservation conditions when you book online or over the phone, you should inform the hotel they are violating the law and politely but firmly ask for the charges to be removed. Obviously you now need to read the fine print conditions when you book online, and should ask if any extra fees are billed when you book over the phone.


2. If you're not using the service you're being charged for, ask to have it removed from your bill. Some hotels remove fees for safes, business/fitness centers, newspapers, and gratuities from your bill. If the latter, explain that you've already tipped the staff (assuming you have). The practice of "negative option billing" -- the legal name for fees billed without your express permission -- is based on the assumption that you've used the service and have therefore implied you agree to the charge. If you don't and haven't, the hotel should remove it from your bill.


3. Look at your bill before you check out, and question any unexpected charges. If you're your card is automatically charged before you receive the bill, look it over as soon as possible and contact the hotel if you see any charges you think are unfair. It's often best to query charges in writing, either via mail or email, so you have a record of what happened should you need to get your credit card issuer involved, or opt to take legal action.


4. Vote with your wallet. Stay at hotels that charge a fair rate for a room and facilities, rather than a bogus low rate which they then jacked up with an assortment of dubious additional fees.

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Note: When renting a vehicle be sure to inspect the inside and outside for damages, be sure to note any damages on the vehicle on the contract no matter how minor. Further use your cell/smart phone camera and take a picture of the damage, this will help in any dispute of damages.

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Helpful Travel Information

Hotels

Adams Mark Hotels

800-231-5858

Best Western

800-528-1234

Courtyard by Marriott

800-321-2211

Doubletree Hotels

800-528-0444

Econo Lodges

800-446-6900

Embassy Suites

800-362-2779

Fairfield Inn

800-228-2800

Four Seasons

800-332-3442

Hampton Inn

800-426-7866

Helmsley Hotels

800-283-3824

Hilton Hotels

800-445-8667

Holiday Inns

800-465-4329

Howard Johnson

800-465-4329

Hyatt Hotels Corporation

800-233-1234

Loews Hotels

800-223-0888

Marriott Hotels

800-228-9290

Marriott Residence Inns

800-331-3131

Meridien Hotels

800-543-4300

Omni

800-843-6664

Outrigger

800-733-7777

Quality Inns

800-221-2222

Radisson Hotel Corporation

800-333-3333

Ramada Inns

800-272-6232

Ritz Carlton Hotels

800-241-3333

Sheraton

800-325-3535

Stouffer Hotels

800-468-3571

Travelodge Interational

800-255-3050

Westin Hotels

800-228-3000

Airlines
           

Air Canada

888-247-2262

Air France

800-AF-PARIS

Alaska Airlines

800-426-0333

Alitalia

800-223-5730

American Airlines

800-433-7300

American Trans Air

800-225-2995

America West Airlines

800-235-9292

British Airways

800-AIRWAYS

Carnival Airlines

800-437-2110

Continental Airlines

800-525-0280

Delta Airlines

800-221-1212

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines

800-374-7747

Lufthansa German Airlines

800-645-3880

Northwest Airlines

800-225-2525

Qantas Airways

800-227-4500

Southwest Airlines

800-435-9792

Swissair

800-221-4750

Tower Air

800-34-TOWER

Trans World Airlines

800-221-2000

United Airlines

800-241-6522

USAIR

800-428-4322

Virgin Atlantic Airways

800-862-8621

 

Car Rentals

Advantage Rent-A-Car

800-777-5500

Alamo Rent A Car

800-327-9633

Avis Rent A Car

800-331-1212

Budget Car and Truck Rental

800-527-0700

Dollar Rent A Car

800-800-3665

Enterprise Rent-A-Car

800-Rent-a-car

Hertz Rent A Car

800-654-3131

Kemwel Holiday Autos

800-576-1590

National Car Rental

800-227-7368

Thrifty Car Rental

800-367-2277

Note: When renting a vehicle be sure to inspect the inside and outside for damages, be sure to note any damages on the vehicle on the contract no matter how minor. Further use your cell/smart phone camera and take a picture of the damage, this will help in any dispute of damages.

Credit Card Numbers (to report lost or stolen)

American Express (Except AZ)

800-528-4800

Diners Club (Except CO & Canada)

800-525-9040

Discover Card

800-347-2683

MasterCard – USA

800-826-2181

MasterCard Outside USA (Collect)

212-974-5696

Visa (Except CA)

800-336-8472

Air Freight Companies

Airborne Express

800-426-2323

DHL Courier Express

800-225-5345

Emery Worldwide

800-443-6379

Federal Express

800-238-5355

UPS

800-742-5877

 

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ABOUT US
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During a demonstration while training at Montford Point, Cpl Arvin L. "Tony" Ghazlo, instructor in unarmed combat, disarms his assistant, PFC Ernest Jones. National Archives Photo 127-N-5334
HISTORY
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product image 2 Herman Rhet "Final Roll Call"

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Pictures of African Americans During World War II


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Fighting for Freedom Documentary Order Form

 

Fredrick Brance Funneral

Poster design by MGySgt Gilbert T. Taylor

 

 

 
National Montford Point Marine Association, Inc.